Choosing a Cross-Platform Solution

  1. The ability to reach multiple platforms
  2. Access to Native device features
Platform choices
Photographer: Kari Shea

Technology stack and tooling

Firstly, an important option is Native, meaning that we have to build a native mobile application for every platform. That means that we have two codebases, one for Android and one for iOS. Writing native code requires the developers to learn specific programming languages. Moreover, every codebase has a different programming language. For instance, on the one hand, the programming language for Android is Java or Kotlin. On the other hand, for iOS, it’s Objective C or Swift.

Access to Native device features

Native device features are very vague. Let me explain to you what a native device feature actually is. Let’s say, for instance, you have an iPhone which unlocks by Face ID. Face ID is built in iOS by Apple. This means that it’s a native functionality of your device. Some apps use Face ID to authenticate or create a payment. These apps rely on the native device features.

The right platform for the job

Tools on a table. Hammer and spanner.
Photographer: iMattSmart

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Passionate Javascript/Typescript developer | Clean code fanatic | Trying to become a productivity guru | Sharing knowledge is part of the process

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Joachim Zeelmaekers

Joachim Zeelmaekers

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Passionate Javascript/Typescript developer | Clean code fanatic | Trying to become a productivity guru | Sharing knowledge is part of the process